Blog Archives

Red Molly: 
Sing To Me

Since 2004, Americana trio Red Molly has been bringing audiences to their feet with gorgeous three-part harmonies, crisp musicianship, and their warm, engaging stage presence. From the start, the trio got attention with their lively, engaging stage performances. They moved quickly from NYC coffeehouses to the festival circuit in less than two years, winning notices for their performances at Merlefest, the Philadephia Folk Festival, and NPR’s Mountain Stage.

Amythyst: 
Myth

Amythyst Kiah is a singer/songwriter that has an eclectic array of musical influences. She has found a way to fuse traditional roots music with a contemporary style that does not take away from the integrity of the original song, and transforms them into powerful, soulful renditions.

Jack & The Bear: 
Gone for Gold

Take three young siblings; one, a horn player; another, a guitarist/writer; and the last, a drum lord. Now, add to the mix two more heart throbs, equipped with keys, enthusiastic vocals, and of course a bodacious, booming bass. Mix all of these things together and you’ve got yourself a meal. A very different kind of meal. A kind of meal intended not for consuming through your mouth–oh no–but for your listening and viewing pleasure.​​

The Tillers: 
Willie Dear

The Tillers got their start in August 2007 when they started thumping around with some banjos and guitars and a big wooden bass. Their earliest gigs were for coins and burritos on the city’s famous Ludlow Street in the district of Clifton. The songs they picked were mostly older than their grandparents. Some came from Woody Guthrie, some were southern blues laments, and many were anonymous relics of Appalachian woods, churches, riverboats, railroads, prairies, and coal mines.

Defibulators: 
Everybody's Got A Banjo

The Defibulators have emerged as one of the most engaging live acts from the thriving roots scene in Brooklyn, NY – melding bluegrass, rockabilly, honky-tonk, and punk into their own eclectic sound. CBGB’s-meets-Grand Ole Opry, indeed.

Field Report: 
I Am Not Waiting Anymore

Chris Porterfield, the leader of Field Report, originally played with Justin Vernon (now the creative force behind Bon Iver) in the Vernon-led band DeYarmond Edison. After the breakup of DeYarmond Edison, Porterfield worked on his own project, Conrad Plymouth, then eventually changed focus to work on the band Field Report.

Spirit Family Reunion: 
Climb Up The Corn

Spirit Family Reunion is aptly named. Pulling elements from the broad spectrum of acoustic American music, the band revives them with highly spirited performances. The old-time charm in the band’s fiddlin’ n’ pickin’ is married to Dylanesque rage in gruffly delivered verses, leave audiences helpless but to sing, hoot, holler, and dance along — finding themselves part of the contagious energy the band creates.

Old Line Skiffle Combo: 
Big Wheels Roll

Skiffle has been described as a distinct blend of rockabilly, folk, ragtime and old style blues. It dates to the turn of the last century and gained momentum during the Great Depression when “rent parties” featured hot string bands playing improvised makeshift instruments. The Old Line Skiffle Combo have rocked the entire earth with their brand of skiffle, old timey, western swing, rockabilly, old country and hybrid “punk swing” tunes.

The Tillers: 
The Old Westside

The Tillers got their start in August 2007 when they started thumping around with some banjos and guitars and a big wooden bass. Their earliest gigs were for coins and burritos on the city’s famous Ludlow Street in the district of Clifton. The songs they picked were mostly older than their grandparents. Some came from Woody Guthrie, some were southern blues laments, and many were anonymous relics of Appalachian woods, churches, riverboats, railroads, prairies, and coal mines.

Field Report: 
Pale Rider

Chris Porterfield, the leader of Field Report, originally played with Justin Vernon (now the creative force behind Bon Iver) in the Vernon-led band DeYarmond Edison. After the breakup of DeYarmond Edison, Porterfield worked on his own project, Conrad Plymouth, then eventually changed focus to work on the band Field Report.