Blog Archives

St. Paul and the Broken Bones: 
Half the City

Paul is a young man who began wailing straight out of the womb, and most folks would agree that he hasn’t stopped since. He began plying his trade with whomever would have him, and happily, folks were mostly impressed by his efforts. With a wholly re-imagined take on the sounds he’d grown up singing and seeking, Paul recruited a rag-tag band of loveable weirdoes, visionaries, and hacks to help him harness the power he now knew he possessed. Under the nom du guerre St. Paul and the Broken Bones, the motley crew roams the countryside looking to get cabooses shakin’, faces meltin’, and brothers and sisters everywhere testifyin’.

Red Molly: 
Willow Tree

Since 2004, Americana trio Red Molly has been bringing audiences to their feet with gorgeous three-part harmonies, crisp musicianship, and their warm, engaging stage presence. From the start, the trio got attention with their lively, engaging stage performances. They moved quickly from NYC coffeehouses to the festival circuit in less than two years, winning notices for their performances at Merlefest, the Philadephia Folk Festival, and NPR’s Mountain Stage.

Whiskey Gentry: 
Particles

Amongst many attempts to describe The Whiskey Gentry, perhaps the best take was from Paste Magazine who called them a “toe-tapping, steamrolling kind of band, its fingers picking deep into fields of bluegrass…with a punk-inspired kick drum.” The Whiskey Gentry’s catchy tunes reel in listeners spanning from music novices to mainstream audiences, while their musical mastery garners the professional praise and respect of those with the most sophisticated of musical palates.

Field Report: 
Taking Alcatraz

Chris Porterfield, the leader of Field Report, originally played with Justin Vernon (now the creative force behind Bon Iver) in the Vernon-led band DeYarmond Edison. After the breakup of DeYarmond Edison, Porterfield worked on his own project, Conrad Plymouth, then eventually changed focus to work on the band Field Report.

Jack & The Bear: 
Eris

Take three young siblings; one, a horn player; another, a guitarist/writer; and the last, a drum lord. Now, add to the mix two more heart throbs, equipped with keys, enthusiastic vocals, and of course a bodacious, booming bass. Mix all of these things together and you’ve got yourself a meal. A very different kind of meal. A kind of meal intended not for consuming through your mouth–oh no–but for your listening and viewing pleasure.​​

The Tillers: 
500 Miles

The Tillers got their start in August 2007 when they started thumping around with some banjos and guitars and a big wooden bass. Their earliest gigs were for coins and burritos on the city’s famous Ludlow Street in the district of Clifton. The songs they picked were mostly older than their grandparents. Some came from Woody Guthrie, some were southern blues laments, and many were anonymous relics of Appalachian woods, churches, riverboats, railroads, prairies, and coal mines.

Whiskey Gentry: 
Eula Mae

Amongst many attempts to describe The Whiskey Gentry, perhaps the best take was from Paste Magazine who called them a “toe-tapping, steamrolling kind of band, its fingers picking deep into fields of bluegrass…with a punk-inspired kick drum.” The Whiskey Gentry’s catchy tunes reel in listeners spanning from music novices to mainstream audiences, while their musical mastery garners the professional praise and respect of those with the most sophisticated of musical palates.

JD McPherson: 
Wolf Teeth

With an unaffected take on vital American music and a voice that channels the spirit of Little Richard and James Brown – JD McPherson and HiStyle Records present traditional Rhythm & Blues and Rock N’ Roll with fresh, exciting songwriting.

Rayland Baxter: 
Ruby Queen

Tradition is a staple in Rayland’s music. In any given song, one can hear the nuances of his favorites from Dylan to Van Zandt, Johnson to Hopkins, or anyone else on the musical map that has tickled his fancy at one time or another. His reconstruction of song is mesmerizing in its own right; a true artist, and a humble man.

Old Line Skiffle Combo: 
Hobo Blues

Skiffle has been described as a distinct blend of rockabilly, folk, ragtime and old style blues. It dates to the turn of the last century and gained momentum during the Great Depression when “rent parties” featured hot string bands playing improvised makeshift instruments. The Old Line Skiffle Combo have rocked the entire earth with their brand of skiffle, old timey, western swing, rockabilly, old country and hybrid “punk swing” tunes.