Blog Archives

The Howlin' Brothers: 
The Troubled Waltz

“The Howlin’ Brothers are a Nashville based string band composed of Ian Craft, Ben Plasse and Jared Green.  Anchored in a bed of old-time blues and bluegrass, their upbeat shows are heavy with original and traditional music, featuring the sounds of slide banjo, harmonica and old-time fiddle. “

Woody Pines: 
Ham & Eggs

 

“No stranger to fans of the new folk music coming from all corners of the USA. Alongside artists like Old Crow Medicine Show and Pokey LaFarge, Woody Pines continues to forage thru the secret world of old 78′s and to write new chapters in the Anthology of American Music. Integrating sounds from Leadbelly to Bob Dylan, from Woody Guthrie to Preservation Hall, Woody Pines belts out songs of fast cars, pretty women and hard luck with a distinctive vintage twang.”

Patrick Sweany: 
Every Gun

“Patrick Sweany likes the spaces in between.
On a given night (or on a given album) he’ll swing through blues, folk, soul, bluegrass, maybe some classic 50s rock, or a punk speedball. He’s a musical omnivore, devouring every popular music sound of the last 70 years, and mixing ’em all together seamlessly into his own stew. Yet, the one thing that most people notice about Patrick isn’t his ability to copy – it’s his authenticity. Like his heroes, artists like Bobby “Blue” Bland, Doug Sahm, Joe Tex, Patrick somehow manages to blend all of these influences into something all his own. “

Chuck Mead & His Grassy Knoll Boys: 
Knee Deep In The Wakarusa River

After leading several popular ‘80s cult bands in and around his hometown of Lawrence, Kansas, Chuck Mead landed on Nashville’s Lower Broadway where he co-founded the famed ‘90s Alternative Country quintet BR549. In 2009, he released his acclaimed solo debut album, Journeyman’s Wager, and toured clubs, concert halls and international Rock, Country and Rockabilly festivals with his band The Grassy Knoll Boys.

The Howlin' Brothers: 
Monroe

The Howlin’ Brothers are a three-piece string band that brings heart and passion into every performance. Their upbeat shows are heavy with original and traditional music, featuring the sounds of slide banjo, harmonica and old-time fiddle.

Sam Lewis: 
In My Dreams

Music was one of the few constants in Sam’s life. His family never stayed anywhere for long, which meant that friendships were forged between himself and the music he absorbed, from Roy Orbison to Van Morrison to Willie Nelson. The influence of Ray Charles can be felt from the first note to the last beat, making Sam’s debut a complimentary companion to Charles’ own, two-volume Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music.

Woody Pines: 
Walking Stick

As the quintessential Americana artist for the 21st century, Woody Pines epitomizes the swinging ragtime and country sound and embraces a simpler time. “Everything from swing band to old country blues goes into our music, along with life’s influences,” says Pines, who left home with his guitar on his back and made it through 49 states before he was 19.

Joe Fletcher: 
Every Heartbroken Man

Joe Fletcher & the Wrong Reasons is an Americana band that began in Providence, RI in 2005. In the center of this revolving cast of musicians, songwriter Joe Fletcher remains at the helm of this country blues-based outfit while still playing many solo acoustic shows throughout the land every year.

JP Harris & the Tough Choices: 
Maria

You thought country music ain’t what it used to be. Think again. J.P. Harris and The Tough Choices have been resurrecting the ghosts of a time when real, hardcore Honky Tonk ruled the airwaves; before the words “pop” or “new” ever met the word “country.” Leaving home at the young age of 14, J.P. Harris has lived the songs HE writes for well over a decade, getting his start around fires in sheep-herding camps in the southwest and hobo jungles across the country.

Sam Lewis: 
Never Again

Music was one of the few constants in Sam’s life. His family never stayed anywhere for long, which meant that friendships were forged between himself and the music he absorbed, from Roy Orbison to Van Morrison to Willie Nelson. The influence of Ray Charles can be felt from the first note to the last beat, making Sam’s debut a complimentary companion to Charles’ own, two-volume Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music.